Hulk Hogan Takes The Stand In Gawker Sex Tape Case

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In a statement, Hogan’s legal team said that Gawker invaded the pro wrestler’s privacy in the name of making a buck and is trying to justify their actions under the guise of “news”.

Splash News Professional wrestler Hulk Hogan, whose real name is Terry Bollea, has filed a $100 million invasion of privacy lawsuit against the news website Gawker. The case involves a 2012 Gawker article detailing a video of Hogan having sex with his friend’s wife, along with edited clips of the video.
Hogan, wearing one of his signature bandanas, is expected to be the first witness to take the stand during the civil trial in St. Petersburg, located in the same county where he lives.
Stay with FOX 13 for more. “Terry Bollea is a normal person”.
Hulk Hogan will finally get his day in court. However, the man with the 24-inch pythons is claiming that he wasn’t aware that the act was being filmed as a sex tape, which changes everything.
“Then we’ll turn it over to Gawker and see how much lipstick they can put on a pig”, Houston said. Asked if he is not beholden to tell the truth as the character of “Hulk Hogan“, Hogan/Bollea defends the “artistic liberty to be a character” while not racing away from the fact that he wasn’t honest.
Despite the choreography and scripted bouts, Hogan said wrestling is “very physical” which has caused him multiple surgeries over the years.
Lawyers for Gawker have argued that Hogan publicly discussed his sex life, that the post is protected under the First Amendment, and that the company “believes this kind of reporting is important”. They’ve also shown a bit of hypocrisy regarding the matter of Hulk Hogan, treating the 2014 iCloud celebrity nude leaks in the exact opposite manner they did the sex tape that’s at the heart of this court case. It was then that Hogan says he knew something was off, asking repeatedly if he was being taped. He also pointed out that, since the post was tagged “Not Safe for Work”, no ads ran next to the sex tape.
According to CNN, Vogt further accused Gawker of being guided by the principles of “power and profit,” using intimate footage of Hogan to achieve both, adding that the site’s philosophy is to “level the playing field, to bring down people like Mr. Bollea – entertainers, celebrities, sports stars”. This testimony set up later discussion of his relationship with Todd Clem, a.k.a. Bubba the Love Sponge, and why a video showing him naked with his friend’s wife harmed him emotionally.
In one interview he said he video made him sick. Gawker attorneys, however, questioned what the wrestler knew about cameras in his friend’s house. The video was removed six months later under a court order, which was later reversed by an appellate court, though the video remains off Gawker’s site.